Rise in mental health concerns among Glasgow teens and children

More Glasgow children and teens with eating disorders have been seeking help, according to a council boss

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And heartbreakingly youngsters have also reported their key worries are poverty, mental health, safety and health in the city.

During the pandemic there has been a general rise in mental health concerns among kids, which was made worse by lockdown, evidence from the Glasgow City Youth Health Service showed.

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Mike Burns ,assistant chief officer children’s services, told the Scottish Government during a consultation: “The primary reasons for referral during this time were anxiety or low mood and self-harm.

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“In total, 70 per cent of young people supported by this service received wraparound support, with the key issues identified as anxiety and stress, depression, self-esteem, anger and family and interpersonal circumstances.”

Mr Burns also told the Government: “Within the Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS), there has been an increase in the number of presentations related to eating disorders and a higher general demand for the service in general, which has had an impact on overall service provision due to the resource needed to support assessment and address the waiting list, as well as respond to increased referrals.”

The Scottish Government asked the local authority for feedback as part of its inquiry into the health and well-being of children and young people.

A Glasgow consultation interviewing 1325 children, young people, parents and workers found key concerns for youngsters are poverty, mental health, safety and health.

One comment made from a child said: “I feel guilty asking my mum for money. She doesn’t have enough. It took me two weeks to tell her if I could have £5 for the cinema.”

The consultation feedback was used to shape the Glasgow city integrated children’s services plan – leading to a focus on addressing poverty and mental health.

When asked what the challenges are with improving children’s well-being and mental health, Mr Burns told the Government recruitment problems for certain roles and short-term funding are issues.