Application for flats on land in Ladyacre Road, Lanark

Watch more of our videos on Shots! 
and live on Freeview channel 276
Visit Shots! now
West of Scotland Housing Association is hoping to develop ground next to St Mary’s Roman Catholic Church in Ladyacre Road, Lanark.

Planning permission is being sought for three blocks of flats – two four storey and one three storey – containing 39 units in total.

There would also be associated parking, bike store provisions and landscaped areas.

Hide Ad
Hide Ad

The housing associaton has been working with the Diocese on the plans, on and off, since 2006.

The three blocks, containing 39 social housing flats, would be sited on land next to St Mary's RC Church.The three blocks, containing 39 social housing flats, would be sited on land next to St Mary's RC Church.
The three blocks, containing 39 social housing flats, would be sited on land next to St Mary's RC Church.

Once occupied by the town meeting hall, which is part of the Diocese and in the grounds of the church, the building was badly damaged by fire a decade ago and later demolished.

The application site is located across from Morrisons, next to the Esso garage, and falls within the town’s conservation area.

Having sought planning permission at the end of last year, the proposal has seen a large number of comments submitted from the public – many in favour of the plans.

Hide Ad
Hide Ad

Among those who has backed the proposal is Bishop Joseph Toal, who has submitted a comment backing the development.

Diocese has been working with the housing association, on and off, since 2006.Diocese has been working with the housing association, on and off, since 2006.
Diocese has been working with the housing association, on and off, since 2006.

In it, he said: “What a great way to use the church grounds to help those in need by building much needed social housing.”

Recent figures show 519 people on the waiting list for an upper floor flat and 625 for a ground floor flat in Lanark.

However, Martin O'Hare, West of Scotland Archaeology Service historic environment records officer, said: “Given the position of the development outside the formal core of the medieval burgh and the fact that portions of it have been disturbed during the modern period, the issues with the current proposal do not appear to be of such a magnitude to advise that consent should be refused.

Hide Ad
Hide Ad

“However, the possibility of the survival of some significant archaeological remains within the development footprint appears strong enough to suggest that some action would be necessary in mitigation of any possible loss of archaeological resource.

“Should the council be minded to grant consent, I’d recommend the inclusion of a condition that no development take place until the developer secures a programme of archaeological works.”

If granted, the anticipated start date is May with an 80 week construction period.

Related topics: