Thousands of Glasgow ballots rejected during local election count - numbers for each ward

Thousands of ballots from voters in Glasgow were rejected at the local election count last week.

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The SNP won 37 seats at the elections last week - one more than Labour - and could team up with the Greens, who won a record 10 seats, to form the next Glasgow council administration.

Following the vote count, official figures produced by Glasgow City Council showed that thousands of ballots had been rejected.

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In total, 4881 votes across the 23 Glasgow wards were rejected during the count.

The votes were counted at the Emirates Arena last week.

Despite the large figure, the council says it is an improvement on 2017 and called on political parties to help ensure that Glaswegians know how to cast their vote.

Ward figures

The figures differed from ward to ward, with some performing better than others.

For example, in Hillhead just 73 votes were rejected, compared to 346 in Canal - the lowest and highest numbers in Glasgow respectively.

Canal had the highest proportion of rejected ballots - 5.4 per cent.

Linn - 9194 - 200

Newlands-Auldburn - 7779 - 214

Greater Pollok - 9138 - 269

Cardonald - 8814 - 242

Govan - 6689 - 233

Pollokshields - 10,551 - 189

Langside - 11,579 - 239

Southside Central - 8013 - 296

Calton - 6274 - 202

Anderston/City/Yorkhill - 6090 - 180

Hillhead - 6998 - 73

Victoria Park - 8701 - 84

Garscadden/Scotstounhill - 8922 - 293

Drumchapel/Anniesland - 7448 - 222

Maryhill - 5864 - 201

Canal - 6138 - 346

Springburn - Robroyston - 7042 - 252

East Centre - 7225 - 268

Shettleston - 7620 - 256

Baillieston - 7421 - 166

North East - 4659 - 158

Dennistoun - 5618 - 154

Partick East/Kelvindale - 10,364 - 133

What is the council saying?

A spokesman said: “Glasgow did not record the highest proportion of rejected ballots – and actually improved on 2017 – however it did remain above the Scottish average in many wards.

“Returning Officers and their staff do everything they can to ensure votes are accepted – but, in some cases, it just isn’t possible to safely interpret a voter’s intention.

“Everyone, including political parties, has a role to play in making sure voters receive clear and reliable information on how the different voting systems used in each election work – and the council will continue to promote and share guidance from the Electoral Commission.”