Stunning art installation celebrating East Dunbartonshire's link to Roman history is unveiled in Bishopbriggs

STUNNING: The installation on the canal towpath comprises of a stone bench, replica carvings, stone cairns, and interpretation panelsSTUNNING: The installation on the canal towpath comprises of a stone bench, replica carvings, stone cairns, and interpretation panels
STUNNING: The installation on the canal towpath comprises of a stone bench, replica carvings, stone cairns, and interpretation panels
An art installation celebrating East Dunbartonshire’s Roman heritage has been unveiled in Bishopbriggs.

Developed in collaboration with Bishopbriggs Community Council (BCC), the bench and stone carvings were completed by talented stonemasons Jo Crossland and Luke Batchelor.

Comprising of a stone bench, replica carvings, stone cairns, and interpretation panels is the installation is located on the canal towpath - opposite the Roman Cadder Fort that was part of the Antonine Wall, the most northerly point of the Roman Empire.

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It was unveiled by Provost Gillian Renwick, who told us: "It is so important we continue to celebrate our local history and protect our heritage for future generations with fabulous projects like this one.

“So many people and organisations have come together to make it happen and the result is something truly outstanding that the local community can be proud of. Thanks to everyone involved."

The groundworks for the project were completed by training academy members of local company Tigers Construction and Paradigm Landscapes.

The £2.1m installation is part of the wider 'Rediscovering the Antonine Wall Project,' which aims to improve awareness and engagement with the site among local communities.

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Other projects delivered in East Dunbartonshire include the Roman-themed play area at Peel Park, a replica distance stone in Twechar, a Roman Granary Garden in Bearsden and a new Roman inspired mural in Kirkintilloch.

Chairwoman of BCC, Katrina Fitzgerald, told the Herald: “We were delighted to be part of this initiative to highlight our area’s Roman heritage. The completed works enhance the local area and we hope they are enjoyed by local residents and visitors alike.”

Project funding came from the National Heritage Lottery Fund Scotland, Kelvin Valley and Falkirk LEADER Programme, as well as Historic Environment Scotland and the relevant local authorities.

Stephen Balfour, project manager for Rediscovering the Antonine Wall, said: “It is fitting this is the last community project to be delivered through our project funding as the project is an excellent example of collaborative working.”