Glasgow City Council

River Clyde regeneration: 12 new developments set to change the face of the River Clyde across Glasgow

The River Clyde is set for major regeneration over the next 30 years - here's 12 developments set to change the face of Glasgow's waterfront

Glasgow's waterfront on the banks of the River Clyde is set to be transformed over the next thirty years as many new developments are set to appear across the city.

The River Clyde is to become a vibrant, inclusive, liveable and well-connected place that will be a world-class destination at the heart of the city - according to Glasgow City Councils new plans, going under the project name: River Clyde 2050: a River Clyde development corridor and strategic development framework. Glaswegians can expect new bars, bridges, restaurants, hotels, and more along the banks of the River Clyde - from the City Centre all the way out to Yoker - Glasgow City Council are prioritising the redevelopment of the River Clyde over the next 30 years - something Glaswegians have been crying out for for years now.

Older generations will remember the days of Panama Jax and other pubs restaurants, ferrys, and more on the River Clyde - even older generations will remember the days when the River Clyde was choc-a-bloc with cranes and the massive metal skeletons of ships mid-construction. This new project hopes to transform the Clyde from a forgotten piece of post-industrial history, little more than an inconvenient barrier between the southside and the rest of the city, to a Riveria of sorts - a more European place to live, work, and spend time around.

Take a look below at 12 of the projects set to transform the face of Glasgow - and for a full run-down on River Clyde 2050, check out the councils document here.

Older generations will remember the days of Panama Jax and other pubs restaurants, ferrys, and more on the River Clyde - even older generations will remember the days when the River Clyde was choc-a-bloc with cranes and the massive metal skeletons of ships mid-construction. This new project hopes to transform the Clyde from a forgotten piece of post-industrial history, little more than an inconvenient barrier between the southside and the rest of the city, to a Riveria of sorts - a more European place to live, work, and spend time around.

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