Glasgow residents still unable to access homes after Storm Malik high winds

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Residents in the west end are still unable to access their homes after the storms over the weekend.

Storm Malik caused further structural damage to the Trinity building on Lynedoch Street in the west end, with residents evacuated to the Kelvin Hall.

Since then, residents of the former Trinity College building and surrounding area have been unable to return to their homes after being evacuated due to it becoming unsafe during high winds.

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Security firm, PID Systems were seen today installing street alarms which would suggest the return of residents is some time away.

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At the time of the evacuation, a spokesman for Glasgow City Council said it would likely be considerably longer than 24 hours before residents could return home.

High winds last Friday and Saturday caused contractors working on the building on Lynedoch Street to call in Building Standards over concerns about the condition of the building.

This led to an inspection which resulted in the evacuation of residents on Saturday afternoon.

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An emergency centre was opened at Kelvin Hall for those evacuated from their home with hotel accommodation offered to a 'limited' number of households who needed it.

A spokesperson for Glasgow City Council said: “26 properties are now within the cordon. A rest centre was established at the Kelvin Hall on Saturday, opening again on Sunday and once more today, with assistance offered by HSCP staff to Trinity residents affected by Saturday’s events.

“This included offering hotel accommodation to the limited number of households who needed it – most people found their own alternative accommodation. 96 people came to the rest centre over the weekend.”

Last January architects warned that the precarious condition of the former church building posed an “immediate” danger to the public at least nine months before chunks of stone broke off the A-listed landmark.

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